The Media Takeover

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What would we do in a world without Google? Think of how many times you have asked Google for restaurant reviews, directions, news reports, or any other important yet random pieces of information. For most of us, the number is too many to count.

This is one example of the world’s reliance on new media. This reliance has affected all other aspects of “old media,” such as newspapers, magazines and T.V. According to Paul Gillin, a long-time technology journalist, old media has struggled with the harsh economic times.

Here are some “old media” statistics from Gillin:

  • Magazine newsstand sales fell 12 percent in 2008 and have dropped another 22 percent this year
  • TV Guide was sold in October for $1, which is $2 less than a single copy
  • 2009 TV station ad revenue to drop 20 – 30 percent (Bernstein Research)
  • NBC prime time audience down 14.3 percent in the past year
  • NBC and CBS executives have publicly entertained the possibility of becoming cable channels
  • Age of average network evening news viewer: 63

To compare and contrast, here are some “new media” statistics:

  • Teens watch TV 60 percent less than their parents and spend 600 percent more time online than their parents
  • Twitter membership grew more than 1,400 percent last year (Nielsen)
  • Facebook’s population would make it the world’s fifth largest country
  • 64 percent of online teens create some kind of published content
  • One-third of Americans under the age of 40 say the Daily Show and Colbert Report are replacing traditional news outlets

Gillin says that the media are a revolution in process, meaning the Internet is bound to take over many aspects of the traditional media models. Clay Shirky, an Internet technology writer, says, “When someone demands to know how we are going to replace newspapers, they are really demanding to be told that we are not living through a revolution. They are demanding to be lied to.” A pretty harsh statement, however, it is a statement that rings true in this economic downturn.

Technology and media are continually and rapidly growing. Although social media and Internet news sources currently hold the title of “new media,” these channels will be replaced and re-vamped in the coming years.

Here is a great YouTube video showcasing the effect of technology and media in today’s society:

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “The Media Takeover

  1. Mariah

    Hi Rachel,

    This is an extremely relevant topic. What is even more interesting is how are newspapers going to market their content online? Before they could charge anywhere from $0.70-$5.00 for a newspaper, while still offering free content online. Now that the majority of people are going online for their news information, how are these companies going to make money?

    Just to expand on your idea of the “revolution,” because news content isn’t going anywhere, just the way people receive it.

    Great post!

  2. Lisa Hass

    I’m buying a laptop, how can I get my newspaper on
    my laptop each morning? I hate the Oregonian’s delivery service and I want to get my local news somehow…any ideas. I’m buying a Mac in the summer. Lisa

  3. rhass2

    Hey Mariah,
    Yeah, that is a good question. Online newspapers will need to exhaust every online ad opportunity possible in order to make up for subscription revenue. If they cannot increase their revenue or stay afloat, they are going to have to start online subscriptions instead of making it free for the newspaper’s public to view.

    It will be interesting to see where it goes in the next couple of years.

    Thanks for the comment!

  4. rhass2

    Hi Lisa,

    I have The New York Times set as my home page, so when I pull up my web browser, I am able to see the all the current news. The New York Times Web site is one of my favorites just because it is constantly updated throughout the day and covers national and international current events. However, if you’re looking for a local online newspaper, like the Oregonian, the Web site is Oregonlive.com. Most papers (weekly and daily) have a Web site. I would google your favorites and check out which you like best.

    Hope that helps!

    Rachel

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